AR15.Com Archives
 Syphoning Gas from a Late Model Auto
CarbineDad  [Member]
6/26/2009 3:56:04 PM
I haven't syphoned gas out of a car's gas tank in 20 years.

I have the super syphons and the plastic hoses and know how to move liquids around

My question is:

Do I remember that new cars have something that prevents syphoning with a hose through the fill nozzle?

I think I remember some of the post hurricaine threads talking about that.

So, talk to me about getting gas out of the gas tank of my late model car, without using an icepick or unhooling the fuel hose at the engine end.
blue70chevelle  [Member]
6/26/2009 4:05:51 PM
it's doable, but its a real PITA with the check valve/ball. The siphon will go down, but might not want to come back up. It took me 30+ minutes of shaking and yanking to get my siphon back on a newer ford..
TomJefferson  [Site Staff]
6/26/2009 4:24:35 PM
Connect your hose to the line the other side of the fuel filter and use the tank fuel pump to pump it out.

The new designs make it pretty difficult on the thief but not so hard on the guy who has the keys to the car.

Tj
zeekh  [Member]
6/26/2009 9:14:10 PM
Originally Posted By TomJefferson:
Connect your hose to the line the other side of the fuel filter and use the tank fuel pump to pump it out.

The new designs make it pretty difficult on the thief but not so hard on the guy who has the keys to the car.

Tj


Thats what I have done. PITA if you don't have the right tools though. Even with the right tools it can be frustrating
Skibane  [Team Member]
6/26/2009 9:14:23 PM
Originally Posted By CarbineDad:
Do I remember that new cars have something that prevents syphoning with a hose through the fill nozzle?


The answer to that question depends on the vehicle. On some recent-model vehicles, siphoning gas out the filler nozzle is still pretty easy - on others, it's almost impossible. Best approach is to check your vehicles BEFORE you really need the gas.

It also helps to use a thin siphon hose. I've used refrigerator water line successfully - The small diameter makes for slow siphoning, but it has the advantage of being rigid enough to force down a pretty convoluted filler passage. Here's an example - the thin refrigerator water line is shown on the left-hand (inlet) side of the photo; conventional rubber fuel hose is used for the rest of the kit:



(This design still needs improving: The squeeze bulb is too restrictive - It really needs to be capable of being removed after the siphon is started).

Another trick is to use a short piece of pipe to keep the filler neck "flapper" open while you're stuffing the siphon hose down it:


This one is made from a standard copper fitting and a few inches of water line (shown in the photo inset)


Originally Posted By TomJefferson:
Connect your hose to the line the other side of the fuel filter and use the tank fuel pump to pump it out.


The engine computer in most vehicles automatically shuts off the electric fuel pump if the engine doesn't start within a few seconds (or if no camshaft rotation is detected, no ignition spark is detected, etc.). So, unless you're planning on pumping gas out of the vehicle while the engine is running (), some wiring modifications to the fuel pump may also be required.
Templar223  [Team Member]
6/26/2009 9:16:54 PM
Skibane,

I know I've said this before, but, "You are the man!".

John
LandRaider  [Member]
6/26/2009 9:25:04 PM
In alot of TBI GM vehicles, there is a "test lead" taped back behind the fuel pump relay. I think you can run 12 volts to them, and it will power the fuel pump indefinantly. It's basically a wire to the NC side of the FP relay, so when the relay is not triggered by the ecm, it is in this position. Ive used this as a diag tool before, but also to pump fuel out of some neighbors vehicles to fuel their generators in the katrina aftermath.

Find the eaiset place to unhook a HP fuel line, and get it into a can, or in our case 5 gallon buckets, and "let er' pump"
LadyMacBeth  [Member]
6/26/2009 9:39:30 PM
I worked on a 94 subaru with an intermitent fuel pump, while diagnoseing I ran the fuel into a 1 gallon gas can,
I only got about 6 fuel relay cycles before the can was full.
That is one fast pump, (rated 75 psi), I imagine most common rail fuel injection systems have similar pumps.
showpare  [Member]
6/26/2009 10:13:10 PM
Originally Posted By Skibane:
Originally Posted By CarbineDad:
Do I remember that new cars have something that prevents syphoning with a hose through the fill nozzle?


The answer to that question depends on the vehicle. On some recent-model vehicles, siphoning gas out the filler nozzle is still pretty easy - on others, it's almost impossible. Best approach is to check your vehicles BEFORE you really need the gas.

It also helps to use a thin siphon hose. I've used refrigerator water line successfully - The small diameter makes for slow siphoning, but it has the advantage of being rigid enough to force down a pretty convoluted filler passage. Here's an example - the thin refrigerator water line is shown on the left-hand (inlet) side of the photo; conventional rubber fuel hose is used for the rest of the kit:

http://img44.imageshack.us/img44/5620/siphonhose.jpg

(This design still needs improving: The squeeze bulb is too restrictive - It really needs to be capable of being removed after the siphon is started).

Another trick is to use a short piece of pipe to keep the filler neck "flapper" open while you're stuffing the siphon hose down it:

http://img30.imageshack.us/img30/9395/fillerneck.jpg
This one is made from a standard copper fitting and a few inches of water line (shown in the photo inset)


Originally Posted By TomJefferson:
Connect your hose to the line the other side of the fuel filter and use the tank fuel pump to pump it out.


The engine computer in most vehicles automatically shuts off the electric fuel pump if the engine doesn't start within a few seconds (or if no camshaft rotation is detected, no ignition spark is detected, etc.). So, unless you're planning on pumping gas out of the vehicle while the engine is running (), some wiring modifications to the fuel pump may also be required.


Very nice. I will emulate your prodigious device and test it on my vehicles.
zeekh  [Member]
6/26/2009 10:13:55 PM
Originally Posted By Skibane:
Originally Posted By CarbineDad:
Do I remember that new cars have something that prevents syphoning with a hose through the fill nozzle?


The answer to that question depends on the vehicle. On some recent-model vehicles, siphoning gas out the filler nozzle is still pretty easy - on others, it's almost impossible. Best approach is to check your vehicles BEFORE you really need the gas.

It also helps to use a thin siphon hose. I've used refrigerator water line successfully - The small diameter makes for slow siphoning, but it has the advantage of being rigid enough to force down a pretty convoluted filler passage. Here's an example - the thin refrigerator water line is shown on the left-hand (inlet) side of the photo; conventional rubber fuel hose is used for the rest of the kit:

http://img44.imageshack.us/img44/5620/siphonhose.jpg

(This design still needs improving: The squeeze bulb is too restrictive - It really needs to be capable of being removed after the siphon is started).

Another trick is to use a short piece of pipe to keep the filler neck "flapper" open while you're stuffing the siphon hose down it:

http://img30.imageshack.us/img30/9395/fillerneck.jpg
This one is made from a standard copper fitting and a few inches of water line (shown in the photo inset)


Originally Posted By TomJefferson:
Connect your hose to the line the other side of the fuel filter and use the tank fuel pump to pump it out.


The engine computer in most vehicles automatically shuts off the electric fuel pump if the engine doesn't start within a few seconds (or if no camshaft rotation is detected, no ignition spark is detected, etc.). So, unless you're planning on pumping gas out of the vehicle while the engine is running (), some wiring modifications to the fuel pump may also be required.


It worked on my 95 Ford Ranger
CarbineDad  [Member]
6/26/2009 10:41:35 PM
Originally Posted By Skibane:
Originally Posted By CarbineDad:
Do I remember that new cars have something that prevents syphoning with a hose through the fill nozzle?


The answer to that question depends on the vehicle. On some recent-model vehicles, siphoning gas out the filler nozzle is still pretty easy - on others, it's almost impossible. Best approach is to check your vehicles BEFORE you really need the gas.

It also helps to use a thin siphon hose. I've used refrigerator water line successfully - The small diameter makes for slow siphoning, but it has the advantage of being rigid enough to force down a pretty convoluted filler passage. Here's an example - the thin refrigerator water line is shown on the left-hand (inlet) side of the photo; conventional rubber fuel hose is used for the rest of the kit:

http://img44.imageshack.us/img44/5620/siphonhose.jpg

(This design still needs improving: The squeeze bulb is too restrictive - It really needs to be capable of being removed after the siphon is started).

Another trick is to use a short piece of pipe to keep the filler neck "flapper" open while you're stuffing the siphon hose down it:

http://img30.imageshack.us/img30/9395/fillerneck.jpg
This one is made from a standard copper fitting and a few inches of water line (shown in the photo inset)


Originally Posted By TomJefferson:
Connect your hose to the line the other side of the fuel filter and use the tank fuel pump to pump it out.


The engine computer in most vehicles automatically shuts off the electric fuel pump if the engine doesn't start within a few seconds (or if no camshaft rotation is detected, no ignition spark is detected, etc.). So, unless you're planning on pumping gas out of the vehicle while the engine is running (), some wiring modifications to the fuel pump may also be required.



Cool, something ELSE I need to start thinking about because of the SF

From your description, sounds like leave the bulb off and start the syphon the old fashioned way

Would be trying to do 2006 and 2007 Ford sedans –– and it sounds like they now have a check valve that makes getting a real hose in difficult.

Or, use the fuel pump –– I knew someone had it all figured out, and Skibane even had pictures

Thanks for the help everyone
Skibane  [Team Member]
6/26/2009 11:02:50 PM
Originally Posted By CarbineDad:
From your description, sounds like leave the bulb off and start the syphon the old fashioned way


The bulb is very nice to have - It just needs to be attached in a manner such that you can quickly pull it off the hose after the siphon is started. Most boating supply stores sell fuel line quick-disconnects - which would probably work OK.

it sounds like they now have a check valve that makes getting a real hose in difficult.


I've never seen a check valve - Usually, it's just a very tight, twisty path between the filler neck and the tank. Also, some vehicles use a corrugated rubber hose to connect the neck and the tank - and the corrugations inside the hose tend to snag any siphon hose that you attempt to insert.
chewbacca  [Member]
6/26/2009 11:04:42 PM
tag
die-tryin  [Team Member]
6/27/2009 8:51:37 AM
Originally Posted By Skibane:
Originally Posted By CarbineDad:
Do I remember that new cars have something that prevents syphoning with a hose through the fill nozzle?


The answer to that question depends on the vehicle. On some recent-model vehicles, siphoning gas out the filler nozzle is still pretty easy - on others, it's almost impossible. Best approach is to check your vehicles BEFORE you really need the gas.

It also helps to use a thin siphon hose. I've used refrigerator water line successfully - The small diameter makes for slow siphoning, but it has the advantage of being rigid enough to force down a pretty convoluted filler passage. Here's an example - the thin refrigerator water line is shown on the left-hand (inlet) side of the photo; conventional rubber fuel hose is used for the rest of the kit:

http://img44.imageshack.us/img44/5620/siphonhose.jpg

(This design still needs improving: The squeeze bulb is too restrictive - It really needs to be capable of being removed after the siphon is started).

Another trick is to use a short piece of pipe to keep the filler neck "flapper" open while you're stuffing the siphon hose down it:

http://img30.imageshack.us/img30/9395/fillerneck.jpg
This one is made from a standard copper fitting and a few inches of water line (shown in the photo inset)


Originally Posted By TomJefferson:
Connect your hose to the line the other side of the fuel filter and use the tank fuel pump to pump it out.


The engine computer in most vehicles automatically shuts off the electric fuel pump if the engine doesn't start within a few seconds (or if no camshaft rotation is detected, no ignition spark is detected, etc.). So, unless you're planning on pumping gas out of the vehicle while the engine is running (), some wiring modifications to the fuel pump may also be required.


Very cool. This is a MUST have. Thanks
TomJefferson  [Site Staff]
6/27/2009 10:13:51 AM
Originally Posted By Skibane:
Originally Posted By CarbineDad:
Do I remember that new cars have something that prevents syphoning with a hose through the fill nozzle?


The answer to that question depends on the vehicle. On some recent-model vehicles, siphoning gas out the filler nozzle is still pretty easy - on others, it's almost impossible. Best approach is to check your vehicles BEFORE you really need the gas.

It also helps to use a thin siphon hose. I've used refrigerator water line successfully - The small diameter makes for slow siphoning, but it has the advantage of being rigid enough to force down a pretty convoluted filler passage. Here's an example - the thin refrigerator water line is shown on the left-hand (inlet) side of the photo; conventional rubber fuel hose is used for the rest of the kit:

http://img44.imageshack.us/img44/5620/siphonhose.jpg

(This design still needs improving: The squeeze bulb is too restrictive - It really needs to be capable of being removed after the siphon is started).

Another trick is to use a short piece of pipe to keep the filler neck "flapper" open while you're stuffing the siphon hose down it:

http://img30.imageshack.us/img30/9395/fillerneck.jpg
This one is made from a standard copper fitting and a few inches of water line (shown in the photo inset)


Originally Posted By TomJefferson:
Connect your hose to the line the other side of the fuel filter and use the tank fuel pump to pump it out.


The engine computer in most vehicles automatically shuts off the electric fuel pump if the engine doesn't start within a few seconds (or if no camshaft rotation is detected, no ignition spark is detected, etc.). So, unless you're planning on pumping gas out of the vehicle while the engine is running (), some wiring modifications to the fuel pump may also be required.


You're right it does, but its not a big deal to turn the key off and then back on a again. Tools and parts, a piece of rubber fuel line hose, hose clamp, screw driver, and channel locks for clamp on type filter connectors.

Tj